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"And that servant which knew his Lord's will... which knew his Lord's will and prepared not himself... prepared not himself, neither did according to his will, shall be beaten with many stripes." D'you hear that? "Stripes." That n***** that don't obey his lord - that's his master, d'you see? - that there n***** shall be beaten with many stripes. Now "many" signifies a great many. Forty, a hundred, a hundred and fifty lashes. That's Scripture.
~ Edwin Epps' biblical justification for his ownership and harsh treatment of his slaves.
"Sin"? There is no sin! A man does how he pleases with his property. At the moment, Platt, I am of great pleasure. You be goddamn careful I don't want to come to lighten my mood no further.
~ Epps to Solomon after he whips Patsey.

Edwin Epps is the main antagonist of the critically acclaimed 2013 autobiographical film 12 Years a Slave. A barbarous plantation owner, he's made a name for himself of being one of the cruelest of slavers due to his relentless brutality.

He has fascinations for both a female slave named Patsey whom he sexually abuses, and Solomon Northup (known by his slave name "Platt" then), whom he is particularly interested in breaking for his wit.

He was portrayed by Michael Fassbender, who also played the young version of Magneto in the X-Men films, Burke in Jonah Hex, and David 8 in the Alien prequels.

Biography

Epps was a particularly infamous slave-owner known to take in and "break" slaves, even those others found troublesome - hence when William Ford was forced to give up Solomon after a confrontation with the plantation's carpenter turned into a near-fatal feud it was Epps who would take Solomon in and very quickly he saw Solomon as clever and this sparked an intense and twisted relationship between the pair, with Epps repeatedly threatening to beat or murder Solomon yet always relenting, seeming to find a strange fascination with his rival and seeking to destroy his spirit (and thus earn himself a victory and prove that he was indeed superior).

Edwin is first seen using biblical "wisdom" to force the slaves to comply with his demands. He forces Solomon Northup to work for him and treats Patsey, a female slave, like his love, raping her on a regular basis. The next day, he gets furious with Northup for Patsey's disappearance and attacks him. He catches Patsey with soap, believing she has stolen it and forces Northup to whip her. Northup begins to do so, but Epps grabs the whip and lashes Patsey ferociously. However, Epps is defeated when Northup is set free and taken home to his family.

Personality

Epps is a vicious brute who takes sadistic pleasure in torturing, sexually abusing, and killing his slaves, rationalizing his behavior by saying, "A man does what he likes with his property". He despises all black people as less than human, put on earth for the sole purpose of being abused, worked, and tortured. Nevertheless, he is infatuated with his slave Patsey, whom he rapes regularly. He is also a sexual sadist; he throttles and hits Patsey while having sex with her. On top of this, he doesn't even care about his wife as he still continues to rape Patsey despite knowing it makes her jealous. If anything, he likely has sex with Patsey to make both of their suffering worse. This makes him much viler than most other fictional slave owners.

Even though Epps knows that black people are able to think and feel, he thought they deserved only the worst possible existence. He took pride in his sadism and found the idea of racial equality humorous, making him one of the evilest slaveowners of all time. This is because he loves tormenting them rather than merely mistreating them because he considered them inferior.

Right before Patsey was whipped, Epps was initially reluctant due to his fascination with her. However, his fear of being made a fool of (which his vile wife used to manipulate him) and his love for cruelty to his slaves was stronger than his mercy, and he allowed himself to be established as irredeemably evil by torturing the innocent Patsey almost to death. He then went and made it worse by verbally admitting that he enjoyed it. Simply put, it was his disregard for other people's freedom and his ability to make them suffer without a second thought that makes him the horrific monster he truly is along with how he doesn't care for Mary at all.

In the film, Epps is shown to be extremely unstable and temperamental, and has wild and unpredictable mood swings accompanied by great violence and confusing changes on a whim - often threatening to torture or kill mass numbers of his own slaves when enraged only to slowly "calm" himself into a more rational (yet still vicious) state. Furthermore, the film, despite toning down his more violent traits, establishes him as a pure evil monster who revels in his sadism.

Despite his hatred of African Americans, he develops a twisted admiration of sorts towards Solomon, fascinated by Solomon's strength and resilience in the face of his cruelty. He makes it his "mission" to break Solomon's spirit. If not for Solomon getting freed, Epps might have succeeded in his goal. However, as expected this does nothing to make Edwin more sympathetic as he clearly enjoys making people like Solomon suffer no matter what.

Gallery

Images

Videos

Quotes

How much can even an average n***** pick a day? (Treach: Two hundred.) This n***** ain't even average.
~ Epps' response to Solomon's (known now as Platt) less-than-average 182-pound cotton yield.
(Treach: 512 pounds for Patsey.) Five hundred and twelve! Your menfolk got no shame lettin' Patsey outpick ya. They day ain't yet come she swung lower than five hundred pounds. Queen of the fields, she is. (Treach: 138 pounds-) I ain't done, Treach. Ain't I owed a minute to luxuriate on the work Patsey done? (Treach: Yes, sir.) Damn queen. Born and bred to the field. N***** among n*****s. And God gave her to me. A lesson in the rewards of righteous livin'. All be observant to that. All. Now, Treach. Now, speak.
~ Epps admiring Patsey's high cotton yield.
Sell little Pats? She pick with more vigor than any other n*****. Choose another to go. (Mary: No other. Sell her.) I will not. (Mary: You will remove that black bitch from this property, or I'll take myself back to Cheneyville.) Back to that hog's trough where I found you? Do not set yourself up against Patsey, my dear. Cause I will rid myself of you well before I do away with her.
~ Epps and Mary argue over selling Patsey after Mary assaults her.
(To the slaves) Whatchu lookin' at!? Damn woman. I won't have my mood spoiled. Dance. Dance, I said!
~ Epps shrugs off Mary.
What'd you just now tell her? What'd you say to Pats? (Platt: Now words were spoken, none of consequence.) You're a liar... You damn liar. I saw you talkin' with her. Tell me... (Solomon: I cannot speak of what did not occur.) I'll cut your black throat!
~ Epps attacks Solomon after seeing him speak with Patsey.
Stay away from Pats, boy!
~ Epps demands Solomon stay away from Patsey, under the delusion he's advancing on her.
It's the Lord's day. Ain't nothin' Christian about us carryin' on like this. I concede to ya. In the name of valor, help your master to his feet.
~ Epps feigns surrender to Solomon after tripping while chasing him with a knife.
It's a plague. (Treach: It's cotton worm.) It's a plague. It's damn biblical. Two seasons God done sent a plague to smite me. What I done that God hates me so? ... It's that godless lot. They brought this on me. I brung 'em God's word and heathens they are, they brung me God's scorn.
~ Epps blames the slaves for God "smiting him" with a cotton worm infestation.
(Judge Turner: I am deeply saddened to hear about your misfortune.) Your price don't reflect your concern.
~ Epps leases his slaves to neighboring Judge Turner.
Listen up: you're Judge Turner's for the season. More if need be, till my crops return. Y'all bring no disrespect to me. You don't bring no biblical plagues to him, y'hear? Or I'll take it out of your skin. Get out.
~ Epps threatens his slaves as he drops them off at Turner's plantation.
Whoa... joyous day. Joyous day. Dark times is behind us. Clean livin' and prayer done lifted the plague! As thick and white as New England snow. Now my n*****s is returned to me. Heard Judge Turner gave you favor. Did you beguile him, Platt, with your slick n***** ways? Well, you won't stand idle, boy. Not on my land. Much work to do! Days of old long since, huh? Joyous. Joyous indeed!
~ Epps "welcomes" his slaves back to the plantation.
Armsby? (Treach: 64 pounds.) A good day's labor would average two hundred pounds. (Armsby: Yes, sir.) I'm sure in time you'll develop as a picker, but takes effort, boy. Put some damn effort into it.
~ Epps to Armsby, a white field hand working in his plantation.
Well, boy, I understand I got a learned n***** that writes letters, tries to get white fellas to mail 'em. Well, Armsby told me today the Devil was among my n*****s, that I had one that needed watchin' or he would run away. When I axed him why, he said you come over to him, waked him up in the middle of the night and wanted him to carry a letter to Marksville. Whatchu got to say to that? (Solomon: There's no truth to it.) You say.
~ Epps confronts Solomon about his deal with Armsby.
Well, I'll be damned. Were he not free and White, Platt. Were he not free and White.
~ Epps is convinced by Solomon that Armsby lied to him.
Hey, Bass. (Offers a flask) (Bass: Oh, no, no, no.) No shame in takin' respite from the heat. Drink, shade. It's ungodly for travelers, hearty or otherwise.
~ Epps offers Bass his solution to the heat.
They ain't hired help! They're my property. (Bass: You say that with pride.) I say it as fact.
~ Epps' and Bass' opposing views on slavery.
I bought 'em. I payed for 'em.
~ Epps continues to justify ownership of his slaves.
You compare me to a n*****, Bass? (Bass: I'm only askin', in the eyes of God, what is the difference?) Ya might as well ax what the difference is between a white man and a baboon. I seen one of 'em critters in Orleans. Know just as much as any n***** I got.
~ Epps' racist views of African-Americans.
You like to hear yourself talk, Bass, better than any man I know of. You'd argue that black was white or white black, if anybody'd contradict ya. A fine supposition if you lived among Yankees in New England, but you don't. You most assuredly do not.
~ Epps reminds Bass that when it comes to views on Black and White folks, he is in the minority in Louisiana.
I knew it, I knew it, I knew it! Patsey! Pats! Where is she? Where's Pats? Where is she, dammit, where is she!? Phebs, Phebs, where is she? Where is Pats? Where is she? Whatchu standin' there for!? (Phoebe: We know nothing of her, Master.) Know nothin' of what? (Phoebe: We know nothing of her.) Of what!? Where's she gone!? (Phoebe: I don't know.) She run off, ain't she? (Phebe: I don't know, Master.) She run off. Where is she? (Phoebe: I don't know, Master.) You know, you know, you know! You know! You know! (Phebe: No, I don't!) You miserable black dogs. You stand like the deaf and dumb. SPEAK!!
~ Epps, in a fit of rage over Patsey's absence, harasses Phebe and the other female slaves.
She gone... My Pats is gone.
~ Epps laments Patsey's disappearance.
Run off? Run off, did ya? (Patsey: Master Epps-) You miserable wench. Where you been? Where you been? (Patsey: I been nowhere!) Huh? Lies to your misdeeds! (Patsey: The Sabbath day, Master. I took me a walk to commune with the Lord!) Bring the Lord into your deceptions!? You're coming from Shaw's plantation. Weren't ya? Weren't ya!?
Now, you speak!? Now that you wanna add to her lies, you find your tongue!
~ Epps assaults Solomon after he attempts to defend Patsey from his wrath.
Oh, I'll fetch you down. I'll learn you to go to Shaw's. Treach! Run and fetch some line. Edward! Strip her. Strike her bare and lash her to the post. You done this to yourself, Pats.
~ Epps has Patsey tied to the whipping post for running off to Shaw's plantation for soap.
Beat her. Give her the whip, give it all to her! Platt, you come here and you beat her now. ... PLATT! COME HERE!! (Patsey: I'd rather it you, Platt!) Strike her. Strike her.
~ Epps forces Solomon to whip Patsey.
You will strike her. You will strike her until her flesh is rent and meat and blood flow equal, or I will kill every n***** in my sight. You understand me?! STRIKE HER!! STRIKE HER!!!
~ Epps forcing Soloman Northup to violently whip Patsey.
Until I say no more; I ain't said nothin'!
~ Epps when Solomon can no longer bear to lash Patsey.
Give me the whip. Give it. Get up! GIMME THE WHIP!!
~ Epps, impatient with Solomon, takes the whip and flogs Patsey himself.
Sheriff, what's all this? (Sheriff: It's official business.) My n*****, my business.
~ Epps to the local sheriff who arrives to confirm Solomon's identity.
You unhand him, Platt is my n*****! (Mr. Parker: He is Mr. Solomon Northup!) You say. You come here, unfamiliar to me, and make claims- (Sheriff: I got no doubts. The man is Solomon Northup.) The hell he is, he's my n*****, and I'll fight you for him! (Mr. Parker: As is your right. As it will be my pleasure to bankrupt you in the courts. Your decision. Unhand him.) I know you had some hand in this, Platt. I'm gonna get to the bottom of it, you hear me? (Mr. Parker: Pay no mind to him.) I payed good money for this n*****, courthouse got papers to prove it (Mr. Parker: And we got papers proving he's free!) I own you. I own you, you belong to me, you hear me, Platt? (Mr. Parker: Unhand him!) You'll have two hundred stripes across your back by sundown!
~ Epps angrily defies the sheriff and Mr. Parker as they take Solomon away from him to freedom.

Trivia

  • Epps was guilty of other crimes in real life that the film does not show. In Solomon Northup's autobiography, Epps would get drunk and make the slaves pull his carriage while whipping them for fun. Furthermore, his whipping of Patsey was even more violent and went on even longer.
  • Michael Fassbender was nominated for 22 acting awards for his portrayal of Epps including a BAFTA, a Golden Globe, and an Oscar and won 13 other acting awards.
  • Epps real house is a modern-day historic site.
  • There is a scene where, after Epps' slaves return from Shaw's, Epps is shown being very friendly to an African American child. People have debated this kindness he holds towards her given this is completely out of character for him. Considering she is never seen again after her one scene, her fate is left ambiguous. Since Patsey was crying as he carried the child, this most likely implies he had something bad in store for her. According to Michael Fassbender in an interview, Epps was raising her to be his next sex slave: "It says so much with him holding her hand, not wearing pants: He is priming the next Patsey. So you find those little elements that add to the character and tell things without any exposition". This would make Epps somewhat pedophilic in his nature (in fact Epps was a pedophile as in reality, he raped Patsey many times, even when she was under 16 years of age).
  • Epps' actions and behaviors are so juxtaposed to his religious convictions that he is guilty of the seven deadly sins:
    • Gluttony - Being an alcoholic, Epps drinks excessively and many things he does are influenced by his intoxication.
    • Sloth - At times, he is seen at times acting lethargic and slouching around, most often while drunk. He also never takes responsibility for anything he does, rather praying that God will fix his problems.
    • Lust - He is obsessed with Patsey to the point that he forces himself on her and beats her to satisfy his sexual impulses.
    • Pride - He considers himself the most righteous man in the room at any given time and thinks the lowest of all but him.
    • Wrath - Given his reliance on the bottle and mental instability, Epps is prone to violent fits of rage, no matter how trivial the reason.
    • Envy - If ever Epps so much as thinks anyone is putting moves on Patsey, his aggressive jealousy gets the better of him and he acts violently towards those who would dare or even Patsey herself; as she says, he is blinded by his own covetousness.
    • Greed - His slaves, especially Patsey, are property to him and nothing more, thus he has no qualms with torturing them. He is also financially greedy, as indicated by his dissatisfaction with Judge Turner's price for his slaves and his anger over losing Solomon, whom he payed "good money" for.
  • Epps read Solomon Northup's autobiography and confirmed it was mostly true, praising Solomon's cleverness. This information was accumulated by Union soldiers during the Civil War.
  • Michael Fassbender was so uncomfortable with the rape scene involving Edwin and Patsey that he momentarily passed out after filming it.
  • Epps and his wife died in 1867, two years after Abraham Lincoln (which by extension means they lived to see slavery abolished) of unknown circumstances, though many speculate it was due to Yellow Fever.
  • Patsey was taken from Epps' plantation roughly a decade after Solomon was freed. According to another slave named Bob, Patsey "went away with our army last week, so she is at last far from the caprices of her jealous mistress." The circumstances of her death remain unknown, but she at least lived her final years free of Epps & his wife.
  • During Michael Fassbender's filming as Edwin Epps, he had his makeup artist paint his facial hair with alcohol so that the other actors naturally react to the smell, making them more uncomfortable around him while filming, and effectively making the characters' fear and discomfort around Epps more genuine.

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