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Revision as of 23:09, September 21, 2019

I have a cousin at Horse Guard, and I have friends at court.
~ Simmerson trying to intimidate Lord Wellington.

Sir Henry Simmerson was an antagonist in the Sharpe series of novels by Bernard Cornwell and the television adaptation.

He was portrayed by Michael Cochrane.

Simmerson was a cousin of the Banastre Tarleton, who had achieved infamy due to his actions in the Revolutionary War between England and her former colonies.

Entering into the British Army, Simmerson obtained command of the South Essex. He was a strict disciplinarian who flogged his men for the slightest offense. Simmerson obtained his officer's rank through his connections rather than actual military ability. Meeting the young Richard Sharpe, Simmerson developed a strong dislike for the highly successful young officer.

At Talavera Simmerson panicked upon coming across a small French patrol and lost the Union Jack to the French patrol.

Simmerson attempted to lie his way out of trouble with Lord Wellington, however Wellington was aware of Simmerson's duplicity due to a report filed by Major Hogan. Wellington thoroughly dressed Simmerson down for losing the colors and for lying, and instead of promoting one of Simmerson's allies to captain, instead advanced Sharpe to that rank. Simmerson tried to intimidate Wellington by mentioning his cousin at Horse Guard and friends at court, but Wellington brushed him off by saying that a man who lost the King's colors lost the King's friendship.

When Simmerson was caught by Father Curtis trying to violate a young woman. Simmerson turned his sword on Fr. Curtis, only to be swiftly disarmed and dropped to the ground by the Irish priest. Curtis stated that Simmerson was a bully, much like Napeloen Bonaparte. Simmerson was left to crawl away on his hands and knees after being defeated by the Irish priest.

Later Simmerson worked with Lord Fenner in running a recruiting scam in which potential recruits to the South Essex were steered in to other regiments in exchange for cash. Simmerson's scam was exposes but he still managed to escape any real punishment for his actions.

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