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James "Jim" Hall is the climax antagonist of Jack London's White Fang. He is an incorrigible criminal who has escaped from prison after Judge Scott justly sentences him for a crime that he did not commit. He kills three guards and escapes from San Quentin. White Fang saves Judge Scott's life when Hall tries to murder the Judge.

History

The newspapers were full of the daring escape of Jim Hall, who had escaped from San Quentin prison. He wasn't born right, and he hadn't been helped any by the moulding he had received at the hands of society. The hands of society were harsh, and Jim Hall was a striking example of its handiwork.

In San Quentin prison, he had proved to be incorrigible. Punishment had failed to break his spirit. The more fiercely he fought, the more harshly society handled him, and the only effect of harshness was to make him fiercer. Straightjackets, starvation, and beatings and clubbings were the wrong treatment for Jim Hall; but it was the treatment he received. It was the treatment he received from the time he was a little pulpy boy in a San Francisco slum—soft clay in the hands of society and ready to be formed into something.

In his third term in prison, he encountered a guard with a similar build and he harshly mistreated him out of spite. Jim Hall attacked and killed the guard and tooks the keys with him.

After the incident, Jim Hall went to the incorrigible cell for 3 years. He never left the cell and never saw the sky nor the sunshine. When his food was shoved into him, he growled like a wild animal. For days and nights, he bellowed his rage at the universe. For weeks and months, he never made a sound, in the black silence eating his very soul.

One night, he had killed 3 guards with his hands and escaped prison. The warden thought it was impossible, but the cell was empty. He was armed with the weapons of the same guards and a heavy piece of gold was upon his head as farmers and officers hunted him down. And the sleuth-hounds of the law, the paid fighting animals of society, with telephone, telegraph, and special train, clung to his trail night and day. Jim Hall disappeared and the bloodhounds vainly quested on the lost trail. The inoffensive ranchers in the remote valleys were held up by armed men and compelled to identify themselves. While the remains of Jim Hall were discovered on a dozen mountain-sides by greedy claimants for blood-money.

In the meantime, the newspapers were read at Sierra Vista. The women were afraid and Judge Scott laughed. Jim Hall was caught and sentenced to 50 years in prison as he swore revenge upon Judge Scott. However, he was unaware that he was being "railroaded" for a crime he didn't commit, while Jim Hall believed that the judge knew all about it and was hand in glove with the police in the perpetration of the monstrous injustice. So it was when the doom of 50 years of living death was uttered by Judge Scott, that Jim Hall, hating all things in the society that misused him. To him, Judge Scott was the keystone in the arch of injustice, and upon Judge Scott, he emptied the vials of his wrath and hurled the threats of his revenge yet to come. Then Jim Hall went to his living death and escaped.

While White Fang and everyone else in the house was asleep, he noticed the presence of someone inside the house. Jim Hall crept silently across the hallway, unaware that White Fang is stalking him. As he climbed up the stairs, White Fang jumped onto him and went for his neck. Jim Hall struggled to get him off, but White Fang pins him down. Everyone in the house woke up to Jim Hall's screams and gunshots as they went out to investigate. Jim Hall began to choke and he died. Weedon turned on the lights and rushed over to the man's dead body with his arm covering his face. Weedon turned the man's face upward, revealing it to be Jim Hall. White Fang was nearly killed himself, but he survived.

Gallery

Trivia

  • Although Jim Hall was not featured in the 1982 anime film Shiroi Kiba Monogatari and the 1991 Burbank film, the scenes where Beauty Smith attacks Judge Scott and tries to kill Weedon are based off him.
  • He served as Charles Beauty Smith's right-hand henchman in the 1973 film and its sequel Challenge to White Fang.

See also

Navigation

           JackLondonTitle Villains

Books
The Cruise of the Dazzler

The Call of the Wild

The Sea-Wolf

White Fang

Question
Jim Hall

Short Stories
Bâtard

The Leopard Man's Story

Moon-Face

Movies
The Call of the Wild (1935)

The Sea-Wolf (1941)

The Call of the Wild (1972)

White Fang (1973)

Klonkdike Fever (1980)

The Call of the Wild: Howl Buck (1981)

Shiroi Kiba Monogatari (1982)

White Fang (1991)

White Fang 2: Myth of the White Wolf (1994)

White Fang (2018)

The Call of the Wild (2020)

Television

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