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Alright, so while I'm aware the show I'm about to discuss isn't supposed to be discussed until tomorrow, it's really just a day early, so let's get started. The show is one of my favorites, and it's called Doctor Who (even though I'm sure most of you already knew that, judging by the title of this discussion post). It's a British sci-fi series about a Time Lord called the Doctor who travels in a box-shaped spaceship called the Tardis. In his war incarnation, he fights in the Time War, and from what he mistakenly believed due to timey-wimey stuff, he killed all of the Time Lord, children included. Because of this, he spent most of his life as the Ninth and Tenth Doctor feeling guilt, trauma, and pain. Fortunately, by the time he became the Eleventh Doctor, he already moved on. The Doctor's faced numerous dangerous enemies including the Great Intelligence, Cybermen, Daleks, Weeping Angels, the Silence, etc. Even the most basic villains in Doctor Who are reality destroyers, so the heinous standards are EXTREMELY high. At least eighteen villains qualify as PE (twenty-four, if you count the spinoffs).

So now, I'm going to discuss season 11, which takes place after the Twelfth Doctor regenerated into the Thirteenth Doctor, who is the first female Doctor, following a Cyberman attack. She meets three people named Graham, Yaz, and Ryan, who obviously become her companions. Most of the villains in season 11 either have no moral agency, or they don't do enough to breach the jacked-up heinous standards. I really feel like I have to mention Krasko, though. He's one of the most despicable villains in the entire DW universe, considering how he's a xenophobe who hates anyone who isn't white, and he attempts to stop Rosa Parks from refusing to give up her seat in 1955 just so he can prevent any accomplishments from black people. However, his worst act (murdering 2000 people) is offscreen, and everything else simply fails the heinous standards. So after two paragraphs of introduction, I'm finally going to bring up the villain who I genuinely see as a qualifier. The name? Tzim-Sha, aka Tim Shaw.


Who is he?

Tzim-Sha, aka Tim Shaw, is the main antagonist in the eleventh season of the Doctor Who revival series. He is a Stenza warrior who wants to become the leader of his species.


What does he do?

Tzim-Sha starts off as a serial killer who targets and murders humans before stealing their tooth and implanting it on his face as trophy. The teeth on his face shows he has a body count of approximately thirty or forty. In the beginning of the episode "The Woman Who Fell To Earth," Tzim-Sha uses gathering coil to attack a train in order to locate his next target, a man named Karl Wright. While the gathering coil is trying to locate Karl, Tzim murders around three people before attempting to kill Karl. He fails, but his actions resulted in the death of Graham's wife, and by extension, it triggered the entire plot of season 11. Then in "The Battle of Ranskoor Av Kolos," it is revealed that Tzim was teleported to a planet called Ranskoor Av Kolos, where he manipulated everyone there into worshipping him as a god. During that time period, he kidnapped the crew of a man named Greston. He also obliterated the population of five planets by shrinking the planets in order to dominate them as a god. After 3407 years, Tzim met the Doctor and her companions again. In order to get revenge against the Doctor for defeating him, Tzim attempted to obliterate the population of Earth. In the end, after his plan failed, Tzim-Sha was trapped in a stasis chamber forever.


Heinous standards?

Like I've said before, Doctor Who has a shockingly high heinous standard. In the modern series alone, we have John Lumic (who had people converted into Cybermen (a fate worse than death) before killing anyone who could potentially sabotage his project), Max Capricorn (who attempted to destroy England in order to frame the crew on a Titanic ripoff just because they didn't vote for him in an election), the Harold Saxon Master (who wiped out a tenth of the world's population, devoured several humans, transformed everyone on Earth into himself, converted people into Cybermen, and killed his own future incarnation just to avoid any chances of redemption), Davros (I'm not even getting started on this one), House (who lured in several Time Lords before murdering them and put Amy and Rory through Saw-esque torture), and numerous other qualifiers. However, in the end, I'd still say Tzim-Sha does enough to breach the heinous standards, considering how he's a genocidal serial killer.


Redeeming qualities/Freudian Excuse?

None. He never shows any genuine remorse or sympathy, there's no implications that he had a tragic backstory, and he's nothing but a vengeful, sadistic, and power-hungry monster.


Conclusion?

He's a keeper.

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